Learn with Allium | Cordyline fruticosa

I said this chapter of Allium is going to be chock full of education… my girl Grace {True Grace Photography} hooked me up by helping me take these STUNNING images to share with you all.

The goal is simple: to inform our audience on all things floral.

Photo: True Grace Photography

Photo: True Grace Photography

I want to share my passion by educating. The few times I’ve had the pleasure of actually teaching people about floral design, I’ve really enjoyed it. But since i can’t always be in a group setting with fresh flowers, I suppose this is the next best thing. There are plenty of tidbits and tricks I can share, and I am happy to do it if it means a greater understanding of our industry! And, if you’re like me, you love the P R O C E S S of something, not just the end result. I’m a big “why” behind the “how” person — when I understand the aspects of the bigger picture, it is easier for me to stay engaged and retain the information.

Photo: True Grace Photography

Photo: True Grace Photography

Today’s quick lesson is all about Cordyline fruticosa, AKA the Ti Leaf. A beautiful, tropical houseplant or cut stem: this baby can do it all. It can fold, bend, and weave (*slices, dices, and chops!*) itself into any shape you can bend it into. Not only that, but it comes a myriad of beautiful colors and sizes. I’m a sucker for using it out of water, it holds incredibly well for the length of an event.

A few Ti folded throughout, with a single variegated one collaring the vase. A perfect way to tie the container into the arrangement!

A few Ti folded throughout, with a single variegated one collaring the vase. A perfect way to tie the container into the arrangement!

a single yellow cymbidium shines atop a loop of a red variegated Ti leaf. Simple & elegant!

a single yellow cymbidium shines atop a loop of a red variegated Ti leaf. Simple & elegant!

A single leaf inside the bubble bowl hides the stems and makes it seem as if this arrangement has sprung loose out of nowhere.

A single leaf inside the bubble bowl hides the stems and makes it seem as if this arrangement has sprung loose out of nowhere.

If you ever find your Cordyline houseplant on it’s last legs, and you want to use the last few leaves while you still can, you can cut them directly off the plant and drop into a vase. As the market changes, I’ve also seen them become available in the cut rounds in your local grocery store’s floral department.

Between their versatility, longevity, & vast color options, Cordyline will continue to be a mainstay at Allium Floral Designs for years to come.